Unsettlement | Exhibition

Unsettlement | Exhibition

Platform Arts, Belfast • 07 – 22 July 2017

Unsettlement is the latest development of visual artist Paul Moore’s #nonarnia project. This Belfast-focused project critiques the adoption of fantastic cultural icons as signifiers of the gentrification processes.

Moore has been producing different works in response to C.S. Lewis’s 1950’s children’s book, The Lion the Witch and The Wardrobe. Each of the individual works has its own unique qualities which bring a relationship to East Belfast and to its community; working separately as individual pieces and together in a series as a larger body of work. For Unsettlement Moore will take over Gallery 1 of Platform Arts, Belfast this July with a No-Narnia-No-Fantasy artistic inquiry into the recent administration-directed gentrification processes in Belfast.

On the opening night, 06 July a procession-performance ceremony will take place at 6.45pm on the ground floor of Platform Arts, entrance from Castle St.

Take part

Post an image of your wardrobe to #nonarnia & write a twitter story for #atthelampost

Check for updates and further information www.nonarnia.com

Accessibility

This is a free but ticketed event, please let us know at the point of purchase if you have any special requirements so we can ensure your comfort at the event. We offer one complimentary ticket for audience members that require a Personal Assistant to attend an event.

https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/unsettlement-tickets-35661464400

Paul Moore: “Furniture can often be overlooked as a mundane feature of the home. But its resonance in our lives is much more profound. Cupboards, for example, contain our past – as well as our regrets and secrets. Our wardrobes, meanwhile, suggest who we might have become, and where we might have gone.”

Moran Been-noon: “Unsettlement acts as a round up of Paul Moore’s No Narnia project. The bigger project’s critique was very whimsical in its approach, however, in this exhibition, the commentary is a matter-a-fact critique of gentrification processes taking part in Belfast. While the work keeps some of its playful nature the approach here is more somber and exposes the back-end views of this directed social mechanism.”

 

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